The 4 Greatest US Victories

Last time we wrote about the costliest battles in US military history. This time, we are going to talk about the greatest victories. All victories come with some sort of loss in terms of casualties but some are worth more than others, even despite the cost. Let’s look at a few of the greatest.

D Day

Also one of the costliest battles in US history, Operation Overlord was one of the greatest as well. Taking place in June of 1944 the battle took months to plan. It would involve a US and UK led coalition of over 150,000 troops as well as countless aircraft and landing craft.

Though it would prove costly from a casualty perspective, the invasion of France would turn the tide of the war and it would be one of the finest days for American military forces.

Battle of Midway

The Battle for Midway was an attempt by Japanese forces to lure the American carriers out to fight. The Japanese had, up until that point, dominated the Pacific and they sought to cement their dominance with the destruction of the US Carrier force.

What would happen is that US code breakers would decipher Japanese communications and set a trap. They would spring it on Japan who would wind up losing 4 carriers. The battle tipped the balance of power in the Pacific away from the Japanese who would soon be forced to go on the defensive.

Battle of Yorktown

This was a decisive battle for American troops in the revolutionary war. It would take place in the first part of 1781when Lord Cornwallis began an invasion attempt in Virginia. He wound up occupying Yorktown and the US forces saw an opportunity for a decisive win as the city would be easier than others to cut off completely from reinforcements.

The siege of the city began in September of 1781and would go on for three weeks until Cornwallis, unable to get reinforcements, surrendered. The defeat would lead to peace negotiations that would ultimately lead to the end of the war.

Battle For Mexico City

The Mexican American war began in 1846 when the US decided to annex a large portion of Mexican territory. Mexican forces would avoid a major conflict by avoiding heavy US forces until the Battle of Mexico City.

US forces led by Scott invaded and eventually took and held the city. The idea was that Mexican forces would be forced to fight to get the city back and the assumption proved entirely correct. The Mexican forces were never able to mount a serious attack to regain the city and the battle would ultimately force Mexico to the negotiation table.

After negotiations, Mexico would give up a third of its territory in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the US would now stretch from coast to coast.